FAQ

Welcome.  You’ve chosen to access our Frequently Asked Questions.  Do you have a question about St. Patrick’s, the Episcopal Church, or the Anglican Communion.  Below you will find a variety of questions posed from various sources.  Have a look, your question may have already been asked.    If not, please scroll down to the bottom of this page and send us your question.  We’ll do our best to find you an answer (or at least point you in the right direction), and, subject to approval, we’ll try to post it here on the site.  And if you have a question that you think needs to be added to the Episcopal FAQ page, please let us know!

1..What is the official name of the church?

2.  Are Episcopalians Catholic?

3.  Aren’t Episcopalians Similiar to Lutherans?

4.  Are Episcopalians Born Again?

5.  Episcopalian or Anglican?

6.  What does “episcopal” mean?

7.  What is the lectionary?

8.  Do Episcopalians read the bible?

9.  How did the Episcopal Church get started?

10.  Are you that church started by Henry VIII?

11.  Is the Archbishop of Canterbury (or The Queen) the Anglican Pope?

12.  Do you ordain homosexuals?

13.  Do you marry same-sex couples?

14.  Do you ordain women?

15.  Do you have saints?

16.  I’ve heard your church called liberal.  Is that true?

17.  Do you have confession with a priest?

18.  Are there any Episcopalians that I would know?

19.  What is the Book of Common Prayer?

20.  What do Episcopalians believe?

21.  What are the beliefs of the Episcopal Church based on?

22.  What does it mean to be an Episcopalian?

23.  Is it true that the Episcopal Church has had the most U.S. presidents?

24.  Given the controversies that are facing the Episcopal Church now, what is going to happen to it?

25.  What is done to help new members transition into the Episcopal Church?

26.  How old is St. Patrick’s parish?

27.  How does someone become a member of St. Patrick’s?

28.  What is the vestry?

29.  Are parishioners welcome to attend Vestry meetings?

30.  What is a diocese?

31.  What is the Eucharist?

32.  What are the sacraments?

33.  How is the Episcopal Church organized?

34.  How do I become baptized?

35.  Does the Episcopal Church baptize infants?

36.  At what age may a child take communion?

37.  I have already been baptized in another church.  If I become Episcopalian, do I need to be re-baptized?

38.  How do I make arrangements to be married at St. Patrick’s?

39.  What is St. Patrick’s position on stewardship and charitable giving?

40.  I plan on visiting St. Patrick’s.  May I take communion?

41.  I have been divorced, or divorced and remarried, may I take communion?

42.  What is the Episcopal Church’s stand on divorce?

43.  What does the Episcopal Church say about birth control?

44.  What does the Episcopal Church believe about abortion?

45.  What does the Episcopal Church say about euthanasia?

46.  What does the Episcopal Church say about the death penalty?

47.  What is the significance of the Episcopal shield and flag?

48.  Do you have to be British, or of British heritage, to be an Episcopalian?

49.  The Episcopal Church is different than any other church I’ve seen.  How do I know what to do during a service?

50.  If I attend St. Patrick’s as a newcomer, will I stand out?

51.  Some of the terms used at St. Patrick’s are unfamiliar to me.  How can I find out more about them?

52.  Do parishioners of St. Patrick’s “dress up” for church?

53.  What is St. Patrick’s view on diversity?

54.  Does the Episcopal Church tell its members everything they must believe?

55.  What does St. Patrick’s offer to families with children?

56.  What does St. Patrick’s offer single and young people?

57.  How can I make a contribution to St. Patrick’s?

58.  What if I have a question about this website?

59.  What are Wednesday night services like?

60.  Who was St. Patrick?

61.  How should I address the priest of St. Patrick’s?

62.  What is a rector?

63.  I’m worried about taking communion.  How do I do it?

64.  How can Christians, and more specifically Episcopalians, make an impact on a culture that seems to be turning from God?

65.  Do Episcopalians believe that the bible is 100% accurate.  Are you literalists?

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1.  What is the official name of the church?

Answer: The official name of our church is St. Patrick’s Episcopal Church. We’re a parish of the Episcopal Diocese of Lexington, a diocese of Province IV (aka, The Southeast Province, or The Province of Sewanee), which is the largest province of the Episcopal Church, USA, and made up of the dioceses of nine Southern states (Alabama, Georgia, Florida, Kentucky, North Carolina, Mississippi, South Carolina, Tennessee, and part of Louisiana).

The official name for the Episcopal Church, USA, is The Domestic and Foreign Missionary Society of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America, but this complete form is rarely found. The most common usage is The Protestant Episcopal Church of the United States of America, or simply, The Episcopal Church, USA.

2.   Are Episcopalians Catholic?

Answer: No, we’re not Roman Catholic. We’re Anglican, which may be more familiar to you as the Church of England. You’ve probably seen Anglican religious ceremonies on television: a British royal wedding or funeral, and the coronation of the British monarch all are Anglican ceremonies, as are a lot of presidential ceremonies in Washington, D.C. (most recently the state funerals of Presidents Ronald Reagan and Gerald Ford). The Episcopal Church, which St. Patrick’s is, is, essentially, the American body of the Church of England, as it evolved in the United States.

However, during the 19th Century, there arose what is called the Oxford Movement, so called for its origins at Oxford University, which called for Anglicans to reacquaint themselves with their Roman Catholic past. From that movement, came the title Anglo-Catholics, which you may hear used today to describe Episcopalians.

It might be noted that the word “catholic” means universal. Therefore, the catholic church would imply the universal church of Christ. In that sense, all Christians are Catholics.  Some of the obvious difference between Roman Catholics and Episcopalians are:

  • Clergy are allowed to marry.
  • Ordination of women as priests
  • The Holy Eucharist is open to all baptized Christians and is offered to all in bread and wine.
  • The democratic structure of the church
  • The national structure of the Worldwide Anglican Communion. Each national church, such as the Episcopal Church, USA, operates separately from the Church of England. Neither the Archbishop of Canterbury or Her Majesty The Queen is the equivalent of the pope, though the archbishop is regarded as “first among equals,” and Her Majesty, as the ecclesiastical leader of the church, is titled “Defender of the Faith.”

3.  Aren’t Episcopalians similar to Lutherans?

Answer: Like the Episcopal Church, the Lutherans have a range of liturgical practices, so depending on where you have experienced worship in the Lutheran church will determine how similar worship at St. Patrick’s is, but Lutherans would easily recognize the basic form of Episcopal worship. The Episcopal Church is now in full communion with the Evangelical Lutheran Church of America.

4.  Are Episcopalians born again?

Answer: Yes we are; over and over and over again.

But most Episcopalians are not “born again” in the sense of a sudden, one time experience (although some Episcopalians have certainly had these experiences). Anglican spirituality is a mystical spirituality with ancient roots, so we tend to speak of a lifelong journey walking in the way of Jesus Christ, a sentiment that you will hear in an Episcopal service. We see all of our lives as a constant striving to accept and follow Christ through corporate worship, the sacraments, private prayer, and our daily living at work, home, community and civic activity, and leisure. Thus, we are constantly being born again (journey of faith), but not in the same way that believers in the Pentecostal or fundamentalist branches of Christianity use the term.

Another reason why we say that Anglicans are born again over and over is because of how we routinely renew our baptismal vows at the Easter Vigil, Pentecost, All Saints, and The Baptism of our Lord. At those times we renounce the spiritual forces of wickedness that separate us from God, the evil powers of this world that destroy and corrupt the creatures of God, and the sinful desires that draw us from the love of God. Moreover, we affirm that we have accepted Jesus Christ as our savior, that we put our whole trust in his grace and love, and promise to follow him as Lord. We are always striving to renounce evil and accept Christ and we believe that this is the work of an entire lifetime. However, this does not negate or diminish the fact that some Anglicans have, indeed, had sudden powerful conversions to Christ. But we would say that the process of conversion, having begun in a sudden and dramatic way, must continue for the rest of one’s life. It must be added that we honor and respect those who have felt a sudden and dramatic conversion.

5.  Episcopalian or Anglican?

Answer: The Episcopal Church (USA) is part of the worldwide Anglican Communion, which means that it has an historic relationship with the Church of England and its primate, the Archbishop of Canterbury.

Not all members of the Anglican Communion have the word “Anglican” in their name. (Examples: the Church of Ireland, the Nippon Sei Ko Kai in Japan, or the Episcopal Church of Burundi) Others do, like the Anglican Church of Canada.

Episcopalians are Anglicans, and Anglicans are Episcopalians, it just depends on what part or province of the Anglican Communion you call home.

6.  What does Episcopal mean?

Answer: “Episcopos” is the Greek word for “bishop.” Thus “Episcopal” means “governed by bishops.” The Episcopal Church maintains the three-fold order of ministry as handed down by the Apostles — deacons, priests and bishops — in direct descent, via the laying on of hands, from the original Apostles.

By the way, “Episcopal” is an adjective: “I belong to the Episcopal Church.” The noun is “Episcopalian”: “I am an Episcopalian.”

7.   What is the lectionary?

Answer: A table of appointed scripture readings that rotate on a three-year cycle.  Traditionally, there will be one reading from the Old Testament, one reading from the New Testament, a Psalm, and a reading from the gospels.

8.  Do Episcopalians read the bible?

Answer: Absolutely!

9.   How did the Episcopal Church get started?

Answer: There have been Anglicans in what was to become the United States since the establishment of the first English colony at Jamestown. Following the American Revolution, some reorganization was necessary for those Anglicans who chose to remain in the new country, as the Church of England is a state church which recognizes the monarch as her secular head (obviously, not a popular idea in post-Revolutionary America!). Thus the Protestant Episcopal Church of the U.S.A. was born. There were some rocky periods, especially in the early days of the church, when bishops of the established Church of England were reluctant to consecrate new bishops who would not recognize the reigning monarch as the head of the church. That’s all water under the bridge, however, and the Episcopal Church is now fully “in communion” with the Church of England, and with other Anglican churches throughout the world.

10.   Are you that church started by Henry VIII?

Answer: Yes and No. While Henry VIII’s desire for an annullment of his marriage to Catherine of Aragon and marry Anne Boleyn was, in a manner of speaking, the straw that broke the camel’s back (and, for what it’s worth, Henry’s request wasn’t out of line with church laws of his day…but that’s another story), the trend toward separation from Rome had been building for quite some time in England, which had never fully embraced the rule of the papacy. See Our History.

11.   Is the Archbishop of Canterbury (or the Queen) the Anglican Pope?

Answer: No, we do not have a pope. The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader of the Church of England, and is considered “first among equals” by the rest of the Anglican Communion. He is highly respected, but he does not have the same authority over the churches of the Anglican Communion that the Pope has over the Roman Catholic Church. The Queen , on the other hand, is considered the ecclesiastical leader of the Church of England, and appoints the Archbishop of Canterbury. Her Majesty bears the title “Supreme Governor of the Church of England” and “Defender of the Faith.”

12.   Do you ordain homosexuals?

Answer: The issue of homosexuality continues to be a lightning rod within the Episcopal Church and the Worldwide Anglican Communion, though it should be noted that there is a wide range of beliefs on homosexuality within the church itself. While the ordination of homosexuals has occurred, during the thirteenth Lambeth Conference in 1998 a resolution was passed stating that homosexual acts are “incompatible with Scripture” by a vote of 526-70; however it also contained a statement declaring this policy would not be the final word and research would continue.

This issue came to the forefront of world news with the 2003 election of Gene Robinson, an openly gay priest, as Bishop of New Hampshire. This followed a similar controversy in England with the consecration of the Bishop of Reading.

In 1976, the General Convention of the Episcopal Church declared that homosexuals are “children of God” and “entitled to full civil rights.”

13.   Do you marry same sex couples?

Answer: In 1998, the Anglican Communion affirmed the historic Christian teaching that marriage is between a man and a woman and that others not called to marriage should remain celibate. So, the official answer is no. However, some diocese have allowed blessings of same-sex couples.

14.  Do you ordain women?

Answer: Yes. The Episcopal Church allowed women to be ordained first in 1976. In fact, The Most Reverend Dr. Katharine Jefferts Schori, a woman, is the Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church, USA. She is the first female elected primate in the Anglican Communion.

15.  Do you have saints?

Answer: Yes. The concept of saints in the Episcopal Church is highly influenced by the Catholic tradition, although the level of veneration given to saints is much more Protestant. Episcopalians pray for each other as members of the Communion of Saints. Both the living and the dead are in the hands of God. With that understanding one sees a wide variety of people thought of as “saints” in the Episcopal Church, such as Martin Luther King, Harriet Tubman, and Augustine of Canterbury. In addition, the Church holds that all members are saints of God and hold the potential to be examples to others.

16.  I’ve heard your church called liberal. Is that true?

Answer: There are both liberal, moderate, and conservative theologies represented within the Episcopal Church. The same could be said of St. Patrick’s.

17.  Do you have confession with a priest?

Answer: Yes and No.  If you would like to confess privately to a priest, you’re more than welcome to do so.  However, the Book of Common Prayer provides for a public confession and absolution in the words of the General Confession, or Confession of Sin, which occurs at Morning and Evening Prayers, as well as the Eucharist.  Private prayer takes place in the prayer book rite called Reconcilitation of a Penitent.  In general, the General Confession relates to the corporate sinfulness of the church, while private confession would lean toward the confession concerns of the individual.

18.  Are there any Episcopalians that I would know?

Answer: Yes, many famous and historical people are, or have been, Episcopalian. See if you recognize anyone here.

19.   What is the Book of Common Prayer?

Answer: The authorized prayer book of the Episcopal Church.  Also, see What’s That?

20.   What do Episcopalians believe?

Answer: The beliefs of Episcopalians around the world can be quite diverse. The standard is the Book of Common Prayer, which contains excerpts of passages from the Bible and various prayers for use in Church (that is, when people gather together for public prayer) and at home (for when a person is alone with his or her God). The Book of Common Prayer also contains several ancient Creeds. A creed is a statement of belief, and these ancient creeds proclaim what the earliest Christians believed to be true.

Included in the Book of Common Prayer, as a complement to the Creeds and Prayers, is a Catechism. A catechism states the beliefs and practice of the Church in a very concise format. It is in the catechism that you may find how Episcopalians view God, Jesus Christ, death, good and evil, and sin. It also explains in a practical fashion what the goal of human life is, and how we may pursue that goal. To answer your question more thoroughly, we’d point you to other links on our site. Try What’s That and Our History.

21.   What are the beliefs of the Episcopal Church based on?

Answer: Our faith is based on scripture, reason, and tradition. We exist to proclaim the good news of Christ!

22.  What does it mean to be an Episcopalian?

Answer: On a daily basis, to be Episcopalian means thinking openly about issues which confront everyone–and responding in a particular way. The Episcopal Church is quite diverse, and welcomes people of all backgrounds and beliefs, allowing them to take on responsibilities ranging from those of the clergy, to teachers, or simply congregation members. The Episcopal Church is not a “preachy” church, and although it does maintain those rituals common to the Christian Church since its inception, it is not a “you must follow the rules or else” type of Church. We are very accepting of others.

23.  Is it true that the Episcopal Church has had the most U.S. presidents?

Answer: Yes. More U.S. presidents have been members of the Episcopal Church than any other religious body, Christian or otherwise. The most recent president was George Herbert Walker Bush (1989-1993).

24.   Given the controversies that face the Episcopal Church now, what is going to happen to it?

Answer:

25.   What is done to help new members deal with the transition into the Episcopal Church?

Answer:

26.   How old is St. Patrick’s as a parish?

Answer: As of 2007, we’re celebrating our 50th Anniversary. We’d be happy to have you join out Golden Celebration.

27.  How does someone become a member of St. Patrick’s?

Answer: If you choose to beomce a full member of St. Patrick’s, there are several avenuses open to you.  First, you may be confirmed if you have no been already confirmed in another parish or denomination that is part of the One Holy Catholic and Apostolic Order.  Confirmation is offered to anyone 11 years of age and older who has been baptised in any Christian denomination.  One simply attends confirmation classes and then is confirmed by the Bishop of Lexington, who visits St. Patrick’s once a year.  Secondly, if you have already been confirmed, you may simply be recieved into the church.  The reception happens at the same time as confirmations, and it is suggested that one attend the classes offered to confirmans prior to being recieved into the church.  A third way of becoming a member in the church is by transferring you letter from another Episcopal parish.  If you hvae been a regular attender at St. Patrick’s, but moved from another city to Somerset, your official letter of membership might be at you former parish.  Some have never moved their letter since baptism.  Simply tell the rector or secretary of your wish o be transferred and the name of your former parish, and this will be taken care of “post haste.”  Please remember, a person does not have to be a “card carrying Episcopalian” to worship or take communion in our parish.  As a matter of fact, there are few things that you need membership to do in our parish.  Take your time to decide for yourself when the time is right.

28.  What is the vestry?

Answer: The Vestry is the governing body of an Episcopal Church, elected to represent the people of the Parish. . The Wardens and Vestry members are elected at the Annual Parish Meeting and serve three-year terms of office.

The Vestry is responsible for all church property and assets, approves the budget, and authorizes major expenditures. The Vestry calls (hires) the Rector, with the approval of the Bishop, and sets the Rector’s salary on the recommendation of the Wardens. The Rector, in turn, hires and supervises all other Clergy and church staff, and has canonical responsibility for the liturgy and worship programs of the Parish.

The Vestry meets monthly to discuss, reflect and take action on the many important aspects of Parish life. It is important to the Vestry that all parishioners feel welcome to share their thoughts and ideas about God’s vision for us as a Christian community, and about your ideas for St. Patrick’s.

29.  Are parishioners welcome to attend vestry meetings?

Answer?

30.   What is a diocese?

Answer: A geographical area that serves as the organizational unit for the Episcopal Church.    St. Patrick’s is a parish in the Episcopal Diocese of Lexington.

31.  What is the Eucharist?

Answer: Holy Communion, the Lord’s Supper, or Holy Mass.  They are all words used to describe the Eucharist.  The Eucharist is the principal act of Christian worship.  Also see, What’s That?

32.   What are the sacraments?

Answer: Baptism, Confirmation, the Eucharist, Holy Matrimony, Reconciliation (“confession”), Ordination and Unction of the Sick. Of these, Baptism and the Eucharist are considered “necessary” sacraments…the others are “conditional” sacraments (i.e., they are not required of all persons, but apply in certain situations). “Sacraments” are defined as “Outward and visible signs of inward and spiritual grace, given by Christ as sure and certain means by which we receive that grace.”

33.   How is the Episcopal Church organized?

Answer:

34.   How do I become baptized?

Answer: Baptism is generally administered on specific dates: Easter Vigil, Pentecost (50 days after Easter), All Saints (First Sunday in November), and the Feast of the Baptism of Jesus (Sunday after January 6). If necessary and for good reason, other dates may be available, but, in no case except for an emergency, is baptism administered during Lent. All baptisms are public and done in the context of a communion service. A family presenting a child for baptism must themselves be active communicant members in good standing of St. Patrick’s. For more information on baptism, feel free to contact our church office.

35.   Does the Episcopal Church baptized infants?

Answer: Yes. We believe that the grace conferred by the Sacrament of Baptism is not and should not be reserved only for “informed believers.”

36.  At what age may a child take communion?

Answer: A child may take communion at any age. We do not believe that a certain “understanding” of the proceedings is necessary for the sacrament to be valid. The decision of when to take communion is left up to the child and his/her parents.

37.   I have already been baptized in another church. If I want to become Episcopalian, do I need to be re-baptized?

Answer: No. “We acknowledge one baptism for the forgiveness of sins.” Once you have been baptized with water, in the name of the Trinity, you have been received by adoption into the family of Christ (not into a particular denomination) and that need not…in fact, should not…be repeated. This is true even if you were a tiny baby when you were baptized. If you wish to make a public, adult, affirmation of faith, you may choose to be confirmed, if appropriate (see above). You also always have the option of publically reaffirming your baptismal vows, even after confirmation, if you so choose…but this is a highly personal matter, and not in any way required.38.   How do I make arrangements to be married at St. Patrick’s?
Answer:
The normal procedure for having a wedding at our parish is as follows:

  • A six (6) week notice must be given to the rector prior to scheduling any wedding.
  • Unless otherwise stated, the rector of St. Patrick’s performs all weddings in our church.  However, if a non-member seeks to use our facility (church and parish house) there will be a rental fee (contact church office) for the church and the parish house.  All wedding parties are responsible for clean-up of the church and parish house.
  • Music/organist will be the organist of the parish.  An honorarium is asked for this service.  The organist should be contacted at least a month in advance of the wedding.  All music is to be cleared with the rector prior to the service.
  • The Altar Guild chairman should be contacted as to arrangements for the wedding.

39.   What is St. Patrick’s position on stewardship and charitable giving?

Answer:

40.   I plan on visiting St. Patrick’s. May I take communion?

Answer: All baptized Christians, regardless of denomination, may take communion in the Episcopal Church. Your own denomination may have some restrictions on where you may or may not communicate, however, so it would be wise to check with a clergyperson in your own church first.

41.   I’ve been divorced, or divorced and remarried, may I take communion?

Answer:

42.   What is the Episcopal Church’s stance on divorce?

Answer:

43.   What does the Episcopal Church believe about birth control?

Answer:

44.   What does the Episcopal Church believe about abortion?

Answer:

45.  What does the Episcopal Church believe about euthanasia?

Answer:

46.   What is the Episcopal Church say about the death penalty?

Answer:

47.  What is the significance of the Episcopal shield and flag?

Answer: This symbol, which you will see at virtually every Episcopal Church and website, is the official “logo” of ECUSA, and depicts our history. It is red, white and blue…the colors of both the U.S. and England. The red Cross of St. George on a white field is symbolic of the Church of England. The blue field in the upper left corner is the Episcopal Church of the U.S.A. It features a Cross of St. Andrew, in recognition of the fact that the first American bishop was consecrated in Scotland. This cross is made up of nine crosslets, which represent the nine dioceses that met in Philadelphia in 1789 to form the Protestant Episcopal Church of the U.S.A.

48.   Do you have to be British, or of British heritage, to be Episcopalian?

Answer: No.  You do not have to be British or even of British heritage to become an Episcopalian.  The Episcopal Church is made up of parishioners from all different backgrounds.  We welcome diversity.

49.  The Episcopal Church is different than any I’ve seen before. How do I know what to do during the service?

Answer: We use The Book of Common Prayer for our services. The program given to you by a greeter, or offered in the narthex, beforehand includes page numbers for reference. Much of the service is copied from this prayer book. You’ll find that we stand to sing, for the Gospel reading and when we say the Nicene Creed. There are other times in the service where people may choose to stand, sit or kneel. The Book of Common Prayer often provides guidance as to what you might do. See What’s That.

50.   If I attend St. Patrick’s as a newcomer, will I stand out?

Answer: We’re a hospitable lot.  We love new faces at St. Patricks.  So, even if you do stand out, you’ll be more than welcomed.   In fact, some have said that one of the most famous street signs in America says, “The Episcopal Church Welcomes You.”  The St. Patrick’s family is no different.   Don’t be surprised if many parishioners introduce themselves to you and welcome you to our church.

51.  Some of the terms used at St. Patrick’s were unfamiliar to me. How can I learn more about them?

Answer: We’ve designed our exclusive Episcopal Dictionary and Encyclopedia, What’s That?, especially for this question. It should answer all your questions. We invite you to familiarize yourself with it.52.   Do parishioners of St. Patrick’s dress up for church?

Answer: Some do.  Some don’t.  The most important thing is that you’re comfortable.  Wednesday nights, however, are usually very casual.

53.   What is St. Patrick’s views on diversity?

Answer: We are proud of the inclusive nature of St. Patrick‘s. I think that you’ll find that we welcome everyone. Our members are from varying backgrounds and communities in the area.

54.  Does the Episcopal Church tell its members everything it must believe?

Answer:

55.   What does St. Patrick’s offer to families with children?

Answer:

56.  What does St. Patrick’s offer single or young people?

Answer:

57.  How can I make a contribution to St. Patrick’s?

Answer:

58.   What if I have a question about this website?

Answer: The quickest solution to a question about the website is to email the webmaster. You can do that by clicking here.

59.   What are Wednesday nights like?

Answer: Traditional Wednesday night services at St. Patrick’s are very laid back and inviting.  Often, the attendance is small and the service intimate.  The dress is almost always casual.

60.  Who was St. Patrick?

Answer: We’re glad that you asked, but it would be much easier to direct you to our “Meet St. Patrick” portion of our website, as the answer would likely to long. To read about St. Patrick, click here.

61.   How should I address the priest of St. Patrick’s?

Answer: The quickest answer is to say that it depends largely on local custom and the priest at St. Patrick‘s. The custom of respect at St. Patrick’s is to call the rector pastor.

“The Reverend” is an appropriate title to precede the full name of a priest or deacon. Reverend is an adjective, not a noun, and should not be used with a last name only, or without the article, “the”, as in “Reverend Jones.”

62.   What is a rector?

Answer: A rector is the chief liturgical and sacramental leader of a parish, who is called by (hired) and accountable to the vestry.  St. Patrick’s is a parish.  The Rev. Dana Hardwick is our rector.

63.  I’m worried about taking communion.  How do I do it?

Answer: Any baptized Christian is welcomed to take communion in the Episcopal Church.  When in doubt, a good piece of advice is to follow the crowd.  The priest will tell you when to come forward to the altar for communion, as well following the service in the BCP, at which point you’ll kneel, and be presented with the host and chalice (independently) with the words:  The Body of Christ, the Bread of Heaven;  and The Blood of Christ, the Cup of Salvation.

64.  How can Christians, and more specifically Episcopalians, make an impact on a culture that seems to be increasingly turning from God?

Answer:

65.   Do Episcopalians believe that the bible is 100% accurate? Are you literalists?

Answer? The best, most probably answer is, some do and some don’t.  You’ll find a large range of beliefs in the Episcopal Church.